Now You See Me (Movie Review)

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  This is one of the movies that is somewhat entertaining upon first viewing but is easily forgettable and has nothing of substance to make a second viewing possible to enjoy. NOW YOU SEE ME pits an elite FBI squad in a game of cat and mouse against a super team of the world’s greatest […]

 

This is one of the movies that is somewhat entertaining upon first viewing but is easily forgettable and has nothing of substance to make a second viewing possible to enjoy. NOW YOU SEE ME pits an elite FBI squad in a game of cat and mouse against a super team of the world’s greatest illusionists.

The illusionists pull off a series of heists against corrupt business leaders during their performances, showering the stolen profits on their audiences while staying one step ahead of the law. The plot is convoluted as we don’t know what the main characters are doing or why they are doing it.  In fact, everything we know about the four magicians is revealed in the first 10 minutes of the movie and after that there is zero character development.

At first, we see the four magicians doing their own little thing separately. They are all trying to make a living doing their magic tricks. They are however far from being big-time celebrities. They are watched and followed by a hooded figure who leaves an invitation in the form of a tarot card.

The four magicians are selected because they excel in their particular field of magic and, mostly, because they sometimes appear to be using real, occult magic.

They are then invited to a strange apartment with strange contraptions in it. After figuring out the riddles that were placed there (an initiation process), they see the elite’s plans laid out for them then, just like magic, they become big-time entertainers.

Age rating: PG-13

Running Time: 1 hr. 55 min.

Genre: Mystery & Suspense

Director: Louis Leterrier

Writers: Boaz Yakin, Edward Ricourt, Josh Applebaum, André Nemec, Ed Solomon